Alice in Wonderland and Literary Devices for Latent Communication

7

1750

In Chapter 1, one may question the use of an anthropomorphic. The purpose is t examine if this is a literary device. The sleepy Alice is jolted into action to follow the white Rabbit because it is anthropomorphic of the shared assumption of what a normal rabbit is. The narrative says. In Chapter 1, one may question the use of an anthropomorphic. The purpose is t examine if this is a literary device. The sleepy Alice is jolted into action to follow the white Rabbit because it is anthropomorphic of the shared assumption of what a normal rabbit is. The narrative says. ‘There was nothing so very remarkable in that. nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, ‘Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!’ (when she thought it over afterward, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural). but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket or a watch to take out of it, …….’What is the purpose of the Rabbit who parodies the human discourteous behavior of unpunctuality? This behavior is so commonplace that it has been accepted as part of the way of life by Alice and thus she did not think it unusual. By drawing attention to the lack of surprise at the Rabbit commenting that he is late communicates these meanings to the reader. The reader is drawn into the world of anthropomorphism where animals live parallel lives. The normality of Alice’s reaction assures that whatever is happening is acceptable. Alice understands that the Rabbit is late for an appointment, as if rabbits, in general, can talk and keep appointments. Alice equates animal chatter as the equivalent to human speech and she does not marvel that it can speak the human language nor does she wonder that she can comprehend him. Carroll did not communicate all these implications directly. His genius lies in his use of literary devices that communicate volumes while speaking less. Alice follows the Rabbit because she has never seen a rabbit with a waistcoat-pocket or a watch. This anthropomorphic parody of human attire violates her assumption of what a rabbit should be wearing.&nbsp. Carroll’s use of puns is examined to determine if they contribute positively towards conveying a latent message. Carroll used this literary device to alert the reader to anticipate an extraordinary event. Alice speaks about a satire to send a pair of boots as a present to her feet. Now, they are so huge and far apart that she fears that there will be difficulties delivering her boots to their respective feet. This is another literary device that Carroll used to show how enormous Alice has grown into.&nbsp. Alice is in an excited state for the narrative says. ‘(she was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English). …….’ Alice communicates her curiosity and current circumstances well. The pun on the word curious shows that Alice is able to communicate meaningfully even as she is frustrated by her lack of success to enter through the door. Carroll uses punning effectively to convey indirectly his intended message.