Analysis of Ayn Rands Novel Atlas Shrugged

With industry, there is no space for sympathy or friendship or charity. There is only efficiency, competitiveness, and innovation. There is only business. There is only business. While it is because of the people who live by the code of industry that such human wonders as the Taggart Intercontinental Line or the Wyatt Oil are made possible, those who do not work to create or to improve but rather play the game of politics which simply depend on knowing the right people resent the power held by people such as Dagny Taggart, Vice-President of Taggart Intercontinental, and Ellis Wyatt, founder of Wyatt Oil. This resentment bloomed to the point where, in their desire for control and power, those who were not part of the industrial sector began to use their political power to take those which they did not work for – the businesses of the very entrepreneurs who had labored to provide goods for the people.
The reasoning behind this movement to seize private businesses was that it was considered unfair to have individuals garner so much wealth from their businesses when there were many who were starving in the streets. It was also deemed unfair that these private entrepreneurs could choose whom they wanted to do business with. Thus, the government began to pass laws that allowed certain businesses to produce only a certain amount of goods (to give other less productive businesses a chance at the market) and also began to seize private businesses and turned them into public industries.
This results in a strike by the industrialists, which occurs through the slow but steady disappearance of each competent worker of various companies that formed the industrial sector of society. And as society is drained of its able-minded members which formed the backbone of its existence, its structure slowly begins to disintegrate, and the looters began to realize the grave error that they made.