Blood Glucose Level

It may be useful to go back one step. Why do we perform BG monitoring in the first place The first function of BG monitoring is to identify whether BGLs are unsafe. Second, we perform BG monitoring to identify trends in individual BG profiles. It is possible this concept is not highlighted enough to health professionals and patients.
It may be useful to go back one step. Why do we perform BG monitoring in the first place The first function of BG monitoring is to identify whether BGLs are unsafe. Hypoglycaemia, even if asymptomatic, which is common in those people with long standing diabetes, with multiple diabetes complications and in the elderly, is serious and underestimated consequence of diabetes medication. Hyperglycaemia, particularly if moderate to heavy ketonuria is present in clients with Type 1 diabetes (Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus) requires immediate treatment.
Second, we perform BG monitoring to identify trends in individual BG profiles. It is possible this concept is not highlighted enough to health professionals and patients. For example, if client’s BGLs prior to breakfast and after lunch are within healthy diabetes range of 4 to 10mmol/L, and three times week after dinner their BGLs are raised to the mid teen level, modification of diet and/or medication may not necessarily be required. We need to look at all our clients’ BGLs in the context of the larger picture rather than focus on just one reading or one part of day.
biochemistry parameter that is very useful to assist capillary BG monitoring in interpreting the larger picture is glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). This test will gives an average BGL for the past three months. Every client with diabetes should have HbA1c performed at least twice a year.
BGLs usually rise during hospitalisation – why Yes, it could be the food the client has eaten but not necessarily for the reasons you may think. Current diabetes dietary recommendations focus on foods that have a low glycaemic index, that is, take longer to be broken down and digested by the body. (Miller, 2005, p.29) Such foods include multigrain bread, legumes and fresh stone fruit. Yet how many of us work in hospitals or residential facilities where such food is readily available on the menu
More often, inpatients with diabetes can only obtain white bread, white dry biscuits and very limited choice of fresh fruit. Therefore, as consequence of high glycaemic index hospital diet, BGLs may rise in comparison with home BGLs because hospital food is more readily digested, and results in higher post prandial (two hours after eating) BGL peaks.
Never underestimate the effects of stress on BGLs. Stress from illness, hospitalisation, even altered sleep patterns can raise BGLs. Pain, infection, immobility and medications such as corticosteroids can have an enormous effect on glycaemic control. In fact, when we identify the reasons why BGLs rise, is it really any surprise that nearly all our clients with diabetes experience hyperglycaemia whilst they are in hospital.
Methodology
We analysed the blood glucose level in the blood (BGL) after consuming 40g of carbohydrate food. One student out of