Causes of Violence in Culture

Though history is replete with the presence of violence in every society of the world since the known records of human life on the face of the earth. somehow, contemporary era has noticed the growth in violence among the members of various group and communities. It has led to the perturbed law and order situation in its wake. Hence, intolerance and prejudice observed by modern societies have given birth to the concept of fanaticism and violence in the world.
The contemporary era is aptly viewed to be the age of technological and nuclear advancements, which has turned life speedy, progressive and complicated one. Revolutionary alterations in the fields of communication, navigations, and traveling have also played significant roles in respect to creating multicultural societies (Macionis 2008). Since the people coming of rival ethno-racial backgrounds have settled in modern societies, the situation of clashes between them is a normal factor. However, the growth of clashes and conflicts between the communities results in turning the entire scenario violent and aggressive.
Marxist perspective declares unjust and unequal distribution of wealth, resources and opportunities as one of the most dominant reasons behind the rise of conflict and antagonism between the groups and communities. The capitalist economic system, according to Marxism, creates an extremely unjust society, where the owners or producers of the agricultural or industrial units exploit the workers and laborers, called proletariat, by offering them very little amount out of the huge and heavy incomes and profits the agricultural and industrial units earn because of the hard toils made by the workers for the growth and development of those specific units. Since an overwhelming proportion of wealth and profit is taken by the ownership, by dint of the investment of money they have made, the laborers are deprived of their respective share against the investment of time, energy and labor they have made for the growth of that particular unit (Ritzer 2010).&nbsp.