Child Labor in the U S and Around the World

According to an article carried in the New York Times, child labor is promoted by aspects such as poverty, some cultural practices, and lack of alternative micro-economic activities (Preston p.3). As a result, the economic disparity between the rich and the poor has pushed many children out of school in a bid to secure some income for their families. It is currently estimated that there are 215 million child laborers globally. Of this total, 114 million (53%) are in Asia and Pacific, 14 million (7%) are in Latin America, and 65 million (30%) are in sub-Saharan Africa (ilo.org).&nbsp.

Child labor refers to any practice that involves using underage children in economic activities which could be in either domestic or industrial settings. The age limit below which a person is considered as an underage varies from one country to the other. For example, in the United States of America, any person who is below 21 years is considered as a child. On the other hand, in sub-Saharan Africa, this age stands at 18 years in most of the countries. This age is normally enshrined in the low of a given country and employers are expected to consider it when providing employment opportunities. Nonetheless, it is unfortunate that most of them have capitalized on the fact that children provide cheap labor to abuse and exploit them. This development has triggered many international human rights organizations to protest about the practice as it is both inhumane and exploitative (Whittaker, 2004, p. 13).&nbsp.The use of children in industries traces its roots back to the 18th and 19 centuries. It was at this period that hand labor gradually took the place of power-driven machines in most of the industrial processes.

The use of children in industries traces its roots back to the 18th and 19 centuries. It was at this period that hand labor gradually took the place of power driven machines in most of the industrial processes.&nbsp.&nbsp.