Contribution to Pop Culture

The first commercial album released by the band with Cliff Martinez and Jack Sherman replacing Slovak and Irons was a flop, caused partly by the discord in music and lifestyle between Sherman and Kiedis. This ultimately led to Sherman being fired from the band. (Kiedas and Sloman, 2004:134). Slovak returned and the group’s second album titled Freaky Styley, introduced elements of punk and funk into the music, but despite the variety of music styles used in the album, it did not perform well commercially. neither were successive tours productive. (Kiedis and Sloman, 2004: 178-9). Cliff Martinez was dismissed from the group in 1986 and Irons returned so that the original creative team were together again and were able to renew their creativity. The band was keen to hire Rick Rubin to produce their third commercial album, but he declined their offer and Michael Beinhorn was selected instead. (Apter, 2004:130-141). The band’s third commercial album titled The Uplift Mofo Party Plan was released on September 29, 1987, containing music that had the same elements of punk and funk that were present in the earlier album but more closely aligned to punk rock and funk metal. This album did not become an overnight success, but it was more successful commercially than the earlier two albums had been. This was, however, a difficult period for the band because not long after the tour following the release of the uplift Mofo album, Slovak’s serious addiction caused his death in June of 1988. (Kiedis and Sloman, 2004:222). Kiedis left the city and did not even attend Slovak’s funeral because he was himself in a surreal state, induced by his drug addiction. Irons also left the group, making it clear that he was not eager to be associated with a group where his friends were addicted to drugs and were dying. (Kiedis and Sloman, 2004:224). This came as a shock to the two members who were left – Kiedis and Flea, who struggled to replace Slovak and Irons.