Explore the Testing and Teacher Controversial Evaluation in New York State Show how the Role of Social Science is Shaping Publi

In what they have referred to as the paradox, liberal social scientists have asserted that ideology and politics are to blame. They have claimed that Americans have solutions but puts every blame in the shoulders of policy makers who are accused of lacking the political will to implement effective policies. According to O’Connor, separation of the working class from the working poor denies the poor their political rights since this denies them access to better wages as result of the organized labour groups of the working class. Since the commencing of war against poverty, which witnessed its offshoot in the1960s, policymakers and intellectuals found in both sides of America’s political spectrum have given working poverty a lot of attention. The perspective of the conservative scholars has been that non-working poverty is a more urgent problem that requires urgent response than the working poverty. They derive this conclusion on the basis that nonworking poverty is a moral danger, which leads to laziness and dependency. On the other hand, they regard any work, even those that are poorly paid to be beneficial. Solving the problem of the nonworking poor according to them can only be stopped if the governments stop offering benefits to the poor. This in a school situation involves even stopping the educational benefits given to the poor. Contrary to their conservative’s counterparts, liberal policy makers and scholars have fronted the argument that the challenges of the nonworking and working poor are intertwined and similar. The have argued that the only difference between the working and the non working l lies in their ability to overcome basic barriers. They have enlisted factors such as affordable childcare services, transportation to work and accessing houses near jobs stations. These challenges according to them can only be overcome by helping the nonworking enter the labour market. This can be done through providing housing assistance, affordable schooling systems and offering other aids to poor families. A charged political system has also seen parties accuse each other for failure to alleviate the working poverty. Policy makers and scholars from the conservative wing have attributed inequality, over taxation and overregulation as the main causes of unceasing working poverty. They are proponents of the view that welfare benefits should be reduced and less stringent lab our laws should be enacted. Liberals on the other hand are of the perspective that reduced or increased governments intervention is the immediate solution to working poverty problem. O’Connor (34-36) asserts that politically charged image, a feature of the nonworking poor as welfare dependant makes reforms in the welfare policies more urgent than the working poor. She is of the conclusion that stipulations in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity act moved most poor parents from welfare roles to workforce. She is of the opinion that this eventuality should have happened after first solving the problem of the working poverty. O’Connor expresses the need for change in the argument about poverty knowledge. She cites political obsession with matters of welfare dependency, which overshadows the problems related to wage decline. Comparisons made between children students non poor families and those from poor families in New York schools indicated that. those from poor backgrounds have got a higher likely hood id dismal performances than those from nonpoor families .Their