Filariasis

depending on what type of parasitic worm has caused the infection, but most of the time all infection start with symptoms like chills, headache, and fever between three months and one year after the insect bite. There may also be swelling, redness, and pain in the arms, legs, or scrotum at the early stages. As far as the diagnosis of filariasis is concerned Identification of microfilariae by microscopic examination is the most practical diagnostic procedure. Examination of blood samples will allow identification of microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. It is important to time the blood collection with the known periodicity of the microfilariae. The blood sample can be a thick smear, stained with Giemsa or hematoxylin and eosin. More recently a new type of diagnosis process has emerged, known to be as cytodiagnosis. A number of evidences have been put forwarded by a number of researchers showing its efficiency. However, time has not come to claim that it is the best methods although at present it seems to be very effective. Whether cytodiagnosis would be the most effective diagnosis process or not, people have be very conscious about the disease filariasis and should take proper medication if infected, and proper preventative measures to reduce the probability of being infected.
Filariasis is known to be as a group of diseases, mainly found in and sub-tropical regions, caused by a variety of parasitic round worms (nematodes) and their larvae. The disease is transmitted to human body by the larvae through a mosquito bite. Filariasis is generally characterized by a number of symptoms like fever, chills, headache, and skin lesions in the early stages. If filariasis remains untreated, it results in gross enlargement of the limbs and genitalia, which is called elephantiasis. (Sasa, 1976)
In Southeast Asia, South America, Africa, and the islands of the Pacific, all of which are situated in tropical or sub-tropical region, approximately