Film Glory

Colonel Shaw, a white man, was one of the leaders who led the 54th in a remarkable and historical assault during the civil war.
The story focuses on the dramatic turns of the black characters, and the floodgating opportunity for the blacks during the period of black slavery. The movie represented two forms of abstract description of humanity in general through its supporting black characters.
Innocence was portrayed by the characters of Jihmi Kennedy (Sharts), a stuttering rural Southerner, who is the most eager to be in the troop, and Andre Baugher’s character (Thomas). The latter is an educated, freeman from the North.
Experienced, in contrast, was represented by the characters of Denzel Washington (Trip), understandably as among one of those who suffered from racial discrimination that was still heavy during the period, and through the character of Morgan freeman (Rawlins). However, Freeman’s character could also be the balanced one for being the oldest among them and able to understand the injustices of the system.
In the movie it was believed that blacks cannot be disciplined or capable for military warfare. Heavy racial discrimination and prejudices against the black soldiers were depicted to emphasis this factual occurrence.
However, it became a motivational factor for Colonel Shaw and his black troops to prove themselves. They have risked their lives and proven that either black or white, it is worthy to fight the lives for, until death.
The fictional part of the film is the lives of the four black soldiers and their detailed account during the war. Along also in this are the views of the soldiers and their behavioral responses in improvised situations that were on the film.
Although based on the real-life characters and the historical details in the movie were very much accurate, Glory was written in about 60 percent fiction. Information that is available about the film mostly stating that the movie has only depicted two little facts about Colonel Shaw.
Many of the prominent critics questioned the film about the perspective view used in the movie. One of these is Roger Ebert of Chicago Sun Times. He stated that:
"Watching Glory, I had one recurring problem. I didn’t understand why it had to be told so often from the point of the 54th’s white commanding officer. Why did we see the black troop through his eyes – instead of seeing him through theirs To put it in another way, why does the top billing in this moving go to white actor"
This could be the weakest point of the film. However, in a more critical view, the essence of using the white’s view of the story is to realize and make it the deprivation of the black soldiers within the story and within the very itself more effective.
In 1989, there were 3 war movies released in theaters. These are Henry V, Born on the Fourth of July, and Glory. Glory was rated with the best battle scenes among the rest of the war films. This could be this film’s strongest point.
The astonishing execution of the battle scenes made viewers instantly in the edge of their seats. It is as though viewers really experienced being in the war of the 54th.
Another of the plus factor that movie could offer its viewers is its excellent cinematography. Despite the year it was released, visual enhancement then was not yet as rich as it is presently, it successfully served its best to come up with a very good