Food Steroids Anitbiotics Sprays Are food manufacturers killing us Annotated Bibliography

English 10 October Annotated Bibliography Adams, Mike. “The U.S. Food Industry, FDA, and USDA Are Highly Corrupt to Protect Profits, Not People.” Natural News. n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2012.
The author takes its cue on the courageous step being undertaken by the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation in banning junk foods, which the FDA and USDA are not bent on doing since they are allegedly being corrupted by food manufacturers. The article identifies refined and processed foods with three properties that are critically alarming to the human health. First, processed foods are lacking in nutritional value since the natural fiber, minerals, oils and vitamins are stripped during the process of manufacturing. Second, processed foods contain metabolic disruptor ingredients like hydrogenated oil, sodium nitrite, aspartame, homogenized milk fats, monosodium glutamate, sodium nitrite and the like that can cause brain damage, cancer, and diabetes. Third, processed foods barely resemble the nature given food that they are due to over processing, overcooking, preserving with chemicals, pasteurizing, homogenizing and even irradiating. Simply put they are dead food that the human body no longer needs.
“Does Giving Antibiotics to Animals Harm Humans?” Daily Herald. Arlington Heights, IL.
April 30, 2012. Print.
This article presents two arguments: from the farmers and from the advocates of public health. The farmers insist that they have to feed the animals with antibiotics to keep them healthy and in order to keep pace with the demands of the U.S. consumers for cheap animal meat. Public health advocates on the other hand argue that such practice of farmers is giving breed to germs in animals that are resistant to antibiotic which causes deadly diseases to the consumers. The intervention of the U.S. government in banning the use of antibiotic in animals in the 1970s did not materialize. The FDA has outlined plans to phase out the use antibiotics for non-medical purposes in animals in the coming years has yet to be seen. The author showed why the use of antibiotics in farm animals was approved in the 1950s as well as the research conducted in the 1970s showing the bad effects of antibiotics especially on E. coli bacteria. The strong lobby from farmers and drug makers for the continuance of use of antibiotics such as tetracycline and penicillin after the result of the research was released forced the ruling of the FDA to ban these antibiotics to be ruled out. It will take some time before FDA will take its final stand on banning the use of antibiotics on farm animals. More statistics perhaps showing human deaths related to antibiotic-fed animals?
Guthrie, Margaret. “Fortifying Food.” The Scientist Vol. 22, No. 1. January 2008. Print.
In this article, the author presents the research on antimicrobial coating for liquid and film containers being conducted by Tony Jin at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Jin is using science to improve the appearance and longevity of food with polylactic acid and nisin, both are derived from cornstarch. The properties of these two components can knock out L. monocytogenes and E. coli. Jin’s current experiment includes the addition of his PLA/nisin film on the insides of bottles of orange juice and egg white, as well as on the packaging of sliced turkey.
Jacobson, Michael F. “Tackling Salt.” Nutrition Action Healthletter Vol.35, No. 1. January-
February 2008. Print.
The article reiterates that 75% of the daily salt intakes of human are derived from the foods bought from the supermarkets or ordered at restaurants rather than on the impulse of shaking salt onto our food from the ever present salt shaker on our table. The cooperation of the processed food manufacturers and the restaurant industries are crucial to bring down the salt level intake of people. The move of the FDA in the 1980s to encourage companies to cut down by 50% the use of salt in their products did not work. The author theorized that it will take about 100 years to bring down to 50% the sodium content of the food in the market. But there’s hope gleaming in the horizon. Several companies including McDonald’s, General Mills, and Con Agra are already starting to cut down on salt. With petitions from concerned groups like the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and a personal letter from every concerned individual to the FDA, the target of reducing salt intake to prevent heart attack and stroke will be achieved.
Lawley, Richard, Laurie Curtis and Judy Davis. The Food Safety Hazard Guidebook. RSC
Publishing. 2008. Print.
This guidebook will open the eyes of every reader to whether steroid hormones used for promoting growth in food animals will post any risk to the health of human. Studies that were conducted showed that steroid hormones in food were suspected to be the culprit in early puberty among girls. However, there is no known study yet linking the exposure to higher than normal levels of steroid hormones from hormone-treated animal food. The use of antibiotics in farm animals as growth promoter was also discussed. The side effects of antibiotics such as the resistance to Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni and enterococci were also discussed. The control options and legislation pertaining to the use of steroid hormones and antibiotics in meat producing animals were lengthily discussed in the book.
Margulis, Charles. “Playing With Our Food: A Massive Food Experiment Already Underway.”
Earth Island Journal Vol. 17, No. 4. Winter 2002. Print.
The author wants the readers to know that thousands of products, including best-known brand name of foods, contain ingredients from genetically engineered (GE) crops. The consumers are not aware of this since these products are not labeled as such. It also tackles the move being done by the Greenpeace group to stop multinational companies in this grand food experiment. It is said that once the genetically engineered organisms are released in nature, they cannot be contained or controlled. These companies are considered the worst producers of pollution in the 21st century. The role of Greenpeace was also reckoned when it successfully pressured Gerber to eliminate all genetically engineered ingredients from its products – after Gerber baby food tested positive to contamination of genetically modified corn and soy. The campaign to stop food experiments with genetically engineered ingredients is widely spreading to consumers, and the advocates are seeing this as a remarkable step towards positive change.
National Research Council. The Use of Drugs in Food Animals: Risks and Benefits. Washington,
D.C.: National Academy Press. 1999. Print.
The book was conceptualized after public concern over food safety in relation to the use of drugs in food animals were received by the government. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) instructed the National Research Council to examine and review the benefits and risks associated with drug use in the food animal industry. The study included the poultry industry, swine industry, dairy industry, beef industry, veal industry, sheep industry, and aquaculture industry. Disease control and prevention as well as trends in drug use were extensively studied. The book also includes the quality assurance programs to be implemented in the different food animal industries.
Poisuo, Pauli. “The 6 Most Horrifying Lies The Food Industry Is Feeding You.” Cracked. n.d.
Web. 10 Oct. 2012.
This article lists down the ingredients in six foods that the consumers are not aware of that may be detrimental to their health. The cellulose wood pulp which provides texture to processed foods is 30% cheaper than the expensive ingredients that make food attractive. The worst part of this is that cellulose is not food at all, though it is edible and non-poisonous. The flavor pack in orange juice, the ammonia in hamburgers, the artificial blueberries are among the lies also included in the article. The truth in raising the so called termed free range chickens were highlighted as well as the health claims of food products such as the yoghurts.
Poulter, Sean. “The Proof Food Additives Are As Bad As We Feared.” Mail Online. 18 May
2007. Web. 10 Oct. 2012.
The article echoes the warning given by parents to their children to avoid artificial additives in drinks, sweets, and processed foods. The behavior problems among children associated with the different food additives were lengthily discussed. Among the food additives reported were Tartrazine commonly found in sweets, biscuits and mushy pies. Ponceau 4R found in sweets, biscuits, and drinks. Sunset Yellow found in sweets, drinks, and ice cream. Carmoisine found in biscuits, jelly, sweets and ready meals. Quinoline Yellow found in sweets, smoked haddock, and pickles. Allura Red found in soft drinks and cocktail sausages. and Sodium benzoate found in soft drinks, baked goods and candies.
Raloff, Janet. “Hormones: Here’s the Beef: Environmental Concerns Reemerge over Steroids
Given to Livestock.” Science News Vol. 161, No. 1. January 5, 2002. Print.
The article discusses the hormones such as androgens, estrogens and progestins fed to cattle to promote build up of muscles and weight gain. The cancer threat posed by the use of these hormones to animals that are in turn being consumed by humans was discussed in John A. Mclachlan’s studies on synthetic hormone diethylstilbestrol (DES). The concerns of different researchers like Bernard Jegou in a meeting in Copenhagen in May 2000 were also presented. The ban imposed by Europe and the regulation of the Center for Veterinary Medicine of the Food and Drug Administration was shown by the author. This article will give the pros and cons of the use of hormones to food animals.
Works Cited
Adams, Mike. “The U.S. Food Industry, FDA, and USDA Are Highly Corrupt to Protect Profits,
Not People.” Natural News. n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2012.
“Does Giving Antibiotics to Animals Harm Humans?” Daily Herald. Arlington Heights, IL.
April 30, 2012. Print.
Guthrie, Margaret. “Fortifying Food.” The Scientist Vol. 22, No. 1. January 2008. Print.
Jacobson, Michael F. “Tackling Salt.” Nutrition Action Healthletter Vol.35, No. 1. January-
February 2008. Print.
Lawley, Richard, Laurie Curtis and Judy Davis. The Food Safety Hazard Guidebook. RSC
Publishing. 2008. Print.
Margulis, Charles. “Playing With Our Food: A Massive Food Experiment Already Underway.”
Earth Island Journal Vol. 17, No. 4. Winter 2002. Print.
National Research Council. The Use of Drugs in Food Animals: Risks and Benefits. Washington,
D.C.: National Academy Press. 1999. Print.
Poisuo, Pauli. “The 6 Most Horrifying Lies The Food Industry Is Feeding You.” Cracked. n.d.
Web. 10 Oct. 2012.
Poulter, Sean. “The Proof Food Additives Are As Bad As We Feared.” Mail Online. 18 May
2007. Web. 10 Oct. 2012.
Raloff, Janet. “Hormones: Here’s the Beef: Environmental Concerns Reemerge over Steroids
Given to Livestock.” Science News Vol. 161, No. 1. January 5, 2002. Print.