How Textile Shall Inform the Future of Architectural Space

There are various objectives that this proposed research is set to achieve. First, the proposed study seeks to highlight certain key concepts in the study of textile and architecture and provide the inter-link between the two. Second, the study seeks to ascertain the role of textile practice within architectural space. Third, the study seeks to highlight ways through which textiles tent to inform the future of architectural space. Last but not least, the study seeks to find out how woven surfaces impacts on space.

Ingold (2007) and Gabo (1999) were fond of roughing up the edge of events. This way, they represented a thing as being distinct from an object, a tangle or a bundle of fascinating lines. Figure (A) exemplifies the Gobo’s view of objects. Fundamentally, they seem to suggest that things seem useful and can be conceptualized as the fleeting material concentration in movement, but not as stable and fixed entities. The views of Ingold (2007) and Gabo (1999) were supported by other researchers, who hold that that architecture can be defined as building-of-an-object, rather than being viewed as building-as-process. The views of Ingold (2007) and Gabo (1999) were supported by other researchers, who hold that that architecture can be defined as building-of-an-object, rather than being viewed as building-as-process. Ingold and Gobo seem to be suggesting that architecture intertwines two vital elements rather than simply under the sky or on the ground. This implies that it is embedded in the thickness of the boundary existing between objects. The idea behind their line of reasoning is that there exists a relationship between architecture and other disciplines including textiles.

The vast history of textiles and architecture starts from their roles of providing protection in building envelope, shade, and shelter, the skin that often originated from the crudely stitched skins of the animals (Orban&nbsp. &amp. Batchelder, 1995).