Identity is always in part a narrative always in part a kind of representation (Hall 1998 147) Discuss this quote with reference to at least two of the re

English culture, as embodied in the afternoon cup of tea or supper of fish and chips is an identity that has developed as a part of the “story of imperialism.”(Back, 1998: 69). Imperial expansion has also moved concomitantly with a historical denial of the role played by Africans and Asians into English culture, which have not gained importance because colonial history has downplayed this side of English culture. Hence English identity reflects its imperial past but its manifestation has been shaped by the imperial perceptions about other cultures as inferior, so that ethnic contributions to culture and identity have been ignored.
Despite this prevalence of imperial perceptions in shaping identity, Back (1998) also points out how imperial expansion itself opened up the avenues for a transformation o the cultural legacy of the empire, by signaling the beginning of an intellectual movement that allowed authors such as Sancho to challenge the forms of knowledge produced in its institutions.(Back, 1998:70). This has produced shift and changes in identity in England, which lend credence to Hall’s contention that identify is relational and shifts constantly, because it is a representation arising out of relationships with others. Back (1998:72-3) also points out how the emergence of technology has changed the former peripheral relationship of the colonies. Identities of races that were former colonies increasingly reflect Western values and experts have argued that there is cultural homogenization taking place.
With the onset of globalization and increasing integration that is taking place, spatial and temporal distances are being collapsed, so that people in remote localities can share a relationship without the need to move physically.(Back, 1998:72). As a result, relationships are changing and the perception of individuals about their identity also reflects a corresponding shift, especially in terms of