If no law is broken is there anything wrong with dumping If so when is it wrong

The Wrongs of Dumping The Wrongs of Dumping Dumping refers to the acts of exporting unwanted or hazardous products especially fromthe United States to the other countries (Shaw, 2014, p.32). The primary aim of dumping is to avoid losses regardless of the side effects that occur in the receptor nations. Morality does not agree with the practices of dumping since the acts receive motivation from commercial gains without considering human suffering. Even if there is no breaking of laws and regulations, it is morally wrong to dump harmful materials to the other countries due to their dangerous side effects.
According to Case 1.1, it is evident that the materials disposed of in the other countries are illegal in the US. Once there is an identification of products and goods as hazardous, all humans require warning about the damages associated with their use. Observation points out that the manufacturers in the US have no considerations regarding the human health because they disposed of the pajamas even after the CPSC labeled them as deadly to the health of the children. The toxicity in the pajamas causes kidney cancers to the children that foster their suffering, and it is wrong to allow their use.
It is wrong to cause deaths knowingly to the fellow humans. For example, the baby pacifiers led to deaths of innocent children despite their banning. The case of exporting contaminated wheat and barley initiated deaths of 400 Iraqis while hospitalizing 5,000 others. The instance followed the export of the banned organic mercury fungicide from the US. The exporters had knowledge about the contamination of the wheat and barley but went ahead to sell them to the other nations. The morals hold that it is wrong to initiate death to the fellow individuals but proposes the spread a word of caution. Regardless of no laws broken, it is cruel to cause human suffering and sudden death. Morals should be self-guiding to keep the human race in existence.
Bibliography
Shaw, W. 2014.&nbsp.Business ethics. Boston, MA Singapore: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.