Limits of Human Knowledge and Experience

This essay highlights that&nbsp.mathematician Leibnitz has contributed to our understanding of human limitations in acquiring knowledge.&nbsp. He famously coined the term “human finitude”, behind which were questions such as “How much can someone possibly know? What could reasonably be viewed as an upper limit of an individual’s knowledge–supposing that factually informative knowledge rather than performative how-to knowledge or subliminally tacit knowledge is to be at issue?” To essay an answer to these questions, let us consider a hypothetical attempt by a human to acquire maximum knowledge.&nbsp. For this thought experiment, we are assuming that this hypothetical person has perfect recall and an infinite memory.&nbsp.&nbsp.
According to the report findings&nbsp.in the Western intellectual tradition that has evolved over the last two millennia, knowledge was the “essential resource for those mortal and particular human beings struggling to cope with a world that could be imagined as being independent from any observer.” Scientific endeavor was thus directed to make knowledge independent of the observer (subjective) into an enduring truth.&nbsp.For a human being to ‘know’ something is one way of gaining access to that aspect of the world.&nbsp. The tradition of ‘reasonable knowledge’ is one that brings into concurrence an individual’s observation through sight, sound and logical analysis with the truth associated with the object being studied.