Love Flower Arranging

The first teachers as well as students were Buddhist members and priests. As time went by, there was the emergence of other schools and the styles changed. Ikebana became a practice and custom among the Japanese people and their society (Ember&amp. Ember, 5).
It is stated that until 1868 it was the Japanese men who ordinarily had the skills to make flower arrangements. After the start of the 20th Century, women began to enjoy the practice and they dominated this discipline. In the United States and England, the lush Victorian style of flower arrangement made way for a simplified modern way that was influenced by the Japanese practice of Ikebana. Around the 1930s, there emerged garden clubs that were supported by women who were influential. The practice became popular as more women began to adopt the practice (Fairchild, 112). Women became obsessed with flower arrangements in weddings, tea parties and to decorate their homes. Men, thus, arranged flowers as frequently as tradition called and required them to, but with the practice becoming female dominated, they did not practice the art of arranging flowers as a hobby (Leaman, 45).
Presently men are turning to the practice. For instance, in Japan, the male workers are turning to the country’s traditional art form or arranging flowers that was female dominated. They are turning to flower arranging as a way to relieve stress (Lover). In America, men are attending classes to learn the art of arranging flowers (Clarke).
The practice of flower arrangement that begun in Japan among men gradually became a common practice among women (Sato and Yoshimura, 200). History has thus repeated itself. The Buddhist priests and noblemen who initially took part in the practice left the art to women. The men managed many flowers arranging schools. however, mostly women dominated those classes. Presently, there is no practice dominated by one gender.