Paper7

The Ugandan experiments can be deemed ethically permissible if the research is in fact used to help the Ugandan people in the future. If this information, however, is only used to aid people in developed nations, then it is simply using these people as guinea pigs, which is not ethically acceptable. While giving some of these women who are infected with the HIV virus placebos instead of the actual medication might seem unethical, it could be argued that at least some of the women will receive this medication. Also the fact that these women are educated on what is happening and, thus, know full well that they may not be receiving any medication helps this experiment’s ethical cause. The most unethical part of this entire scenario is the fact that drug companies have made these products so expensive that they cannot be afforded by the countries that truly need them, making experiments like this both possible and necessary. All of these women who took place in this experiment in Uganda had a choice and, therefore, they were in control of whether or not they wished to have a chance at receiving this drug. In countries where diseases such as HIV are so rampant, alternative methods of treatment must be created, since this medication is so expensive, and the fact that this form of research is so rapid could save lives in the future because it will create data very quickly.