People in History

This paper has selected Herbert Hoover and Frances Perkins as its two discussions who are considered to have played key roles in forming the America we know of today.
Herbert Hoover, the 31st United States President, was born to a Quaker home and specialized in mining engineering (Hoover 19). He attained American and global prominence in humanitarian liberation efforts, in Belgium war-time, and worked as chair of the United States Food Administration throughout the First World War (Schiff 66).
Hoover, an internationally qualified engineer, believed greatly in the Efficiency Movement, which detained that the government, as well as the financial system, were puzzled with inadequacy and waste, and could be enhanced by experts who could spot the problems and unravel them (Hoover 21). He also trusted in the significance of volunteerism along with of the role of people in society and their financial system. Herbert, who had made a petite fortune in his mining job, was the former of two United States leaders to donate their income (President Kennedy was the other) (Schiff 70). When the 1929 Crash of Wall Street hit less than 8 months after Herbert assumed office, he attempted to fight the resulting Great Depression with Congressional enforced attempts, tariffs like the Smoot-Hawley Tariff, public projects like the Hoover Dam, a rise from 25% in the top tax bracket to 63%, and raises in corporate taxes. These proposals did not create economic recovery in his term but worked as the foundation for a variety of policies integrated in Franklin D. Roosevelts government (Hoover 34). After 1933, Hoover became a spokesperson against the domestic and international policies in Roosevelts New Deal. In 1947, President Truman brought Hoover back to assist in making the federal government more efficient by setting up the Hoover Commission. The agreement