Political Science Human Trafficking and the CAST Organization

Political Science, Human Trafficking and the CAST Organization Human trafficking Human trafficking is where people are acquired improperly by means like deception, fraud, and or by use of force with the main objective of exploiting them. It involves smuggling of people for money or other benefits into another state they do not belong to. This crime affects every country in the world. The rich and poor countries have a challenge to get the criminals behind this act and to assist and protect victims of smuggled immigrants. These victims endure hard ship for a better life. There are several ways of human trafficking for instance. sex trafficking and labour trafficking or exploitation1. Below are stories of victims who were exploited through labour with little or no pay at all.Victim’s storiesKumarA company in Jordan to work in the United States of America promised Kumar Ramjali from Nepal. However, instead of being taken to United States, he was forcefully taken to Iraq to work for the US army. His passport was seized and was not given permission to leave for over four years2.JanaA 30- year old Bosnian lady named Jana was also a victim of job scam. She went to Slovenia for further studies. On reaching there, she got a female friend who organised for her an accounting job. On the interview day, a woman interviewed her then abruptly two men came into the interview room, which ended the interview. The men forcibly removed her out, she was beaten and raped several times by the men, after which she was taken to a secluded place raped repeatedly and drugged with drugs. Jana escaped from the traffickers after four months and now she is advocating against trafficking3. Most of the victims and experts agree that a lot must be done in providing protection and assistance to those affected by human trafficking. Perpetrators of this violation of human rights should be punished and prosecuted.CastCoalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST) is an organisation in United States of America that provides services to trafficking victims. They have a client- centred approach in its interconnected activities to empower victims of trafficking in realizing their potential. They provide comprehensive services to trafficking victims, through provision of basic human needs, medical health care and legal services. CAST opened its first shelter in United States in 20044. It conducts policies that are aimed at advancing and protecting human rights of trafficking victims. It achieves these through experience and research of its clients both inside and outside the justice system5. It also provides training programmes to NGOs and IGOs that may interact with trafficked persons. CAST promotes freedom and dignity of trafficked victims through public awareness and community organizing. They encourage entrepreneurial spirit through public speaking and advocacy of media. They recognize trafficked people as community members who contribute6. ConclusionSince human trafficking is a bad vice, much should be done in aid of victims by helping them rebuild their lives. Among the things to be done include the identification of the victims and the public awareness. This may be realized using restore and rescue campaigns. Secondly, assisting human trafficking victims is inevitable7. This is enhanced through the creation of certification and letters of eligibility, having per capita service contract and establishing resource centres worldwide to address the issues of human trafficking.Reference ListBallinger, Jeff. How Civil Society Can Help. Harvard International Review 33, no. 2: 54-59. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed December 10, 2011).Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST) http://www.castla.org/about-us.Laczko, Frank. Data and Research on Human Trafficking. International Migration 43, no. 1/2: 5-16. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed December 7, 2011).Rourke, John T. and Mark A. Boyer. International politics on the world stage. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.Thrupkaew, Noy. Beyond Rescue. Nation 289, no. 13: 21-24. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed December 7, 2011).