Primary Mental Health Care

The Winning New Jobs Program was developed in the United States to help unemployed workers effectively seek re-employment and cope with the multiple challenges of unemployment and job search (Caplan et al. 1989. Price et al. 1992. Price &amp. Vinokur 1995). The program is based on theories of an active learning process, social modeling, gradual exposure to acquiring skills, practice through role-playing, and inoculation against setbacks. Over one week, five intensive half-day workshops are held. The workshops focus on identifying effective job search strategies, improving participants’ job search skills, increasing self-esteem and confidence, and motivating participants to persist in job search activities. Two trainers deliver the program to groups of 12–20 people. The intervention is designed to achieve its goals by creating supportive environments and relationships between trainers and participants and among participants. The program has been evaluated in replicated randomised trials involving thousands of unemployed workers and their partners in the quality of re-employment, increased self-esteem and decreased psychological distress and depressive symptoms over two years, particularly among those with a higher risk for depression (Price et al. 1992). In addition, the program has been shown to inoculate workers against the adverse effects of subsequent job loss because workers gain an enhanced sense of mastery over the challenges of job search (Price 2003).

A case study unemployed workers from Jane-Llopis et. at. 2005 will make the situation clear.
Case study: the Winning New Jobs Program – promoting re-employment and mental health: The Winning New Jobs Program was developed in the United States to help unemployed workers effectively seek re-employment and cope with the multiple challenges of unemployment and job search (Caplan et al. 1989. Price et al. 1992. Price &amp. Vinokur 1995). The program is based on theories of active learning process, social modelling, gradual exposure to acquiring skills, practice through role-playing, and inoculation against setbacks. Over one week, five intensive half-day workshops are held. The workshops focus on identifying effective job search strategies, improving participants’ job search skills, increasing self-esteem and confidence, and motivating participants to persist in job search activities. Two trainers deliver the program to groups of 12-20 people. The intervention is designed to achieve its goals by creating supportive environments and relationships between trainers and participants and among participants. The program has been evaluated in replicated randomised trials involving thousands of unemployed workers and their partners in the quality of re-employment, increased self-esteem and decreased psychological distress and depressive symptoms over two years, particularly among those with a higher risk for depression (Price et al. 1992). In addition, the program has been shown to inoculate workers against the adverse effects of subsequent job loss because workers gain an enhanced sense of mastery over the challenges of job search (Price 2003).
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