Professional Autonomy as an Advanced Clinical Practitioner

The trend to be advocated today is to promote health through the proper education of the primary health care providers and the patients as well. To respond to the need of the patients, it is best to improve first the skills, competence and independence of the nurse practitioners caring for them. This is the professional autonomy of the advanced clinical practitioners that pertain to their capability to work and serve the patients without depending on the instructions or supervisions of the physician (Dueker et al., 2005).
The degree of this professional autonomy may vary depending on what policies a given locality may have. There could be certain areas in the clinical setting where substantial regulations are imposed on the authority of the nurse practitioners. For example in United States, some states have granted nurse practitioners the authority to prescribe medications of certain controlled substances (Pearson, 1998). Such responsibilities and tasks show how dynamic and comprehensive a nurse practitioner must be.
The culture of nursing has evolved through the years. Nursing people probably existed from the time that people started getting sick. However, traditionally, people think of nurses as the ones who help and follow the instructions of the doctor to implement the treatment of the patient. They also are the ones who do the actual caring and assistance to the patients. Such are very noble acts and they still hold true today. However, there is a more dynamic point to things now (Dueker et al. 2005).
Today, the nurturing provided by advanced clinical practitioners goes beyond the usual or traditional notion of their roles in health care. Today, competent nurses are equipped with the right knowledge and skills that will be able to support and educate a patient, from the time of their referral until they are discharged from the hospital (Dueker et al. 2005).
The International Council of Nurses or ICN (2002) has defined the role of nurses today as clinical practitioners as one who is duly registered and who has been able to obtain an expert level of knowledge base, capable of decision-making even on complex situations and medically competent for practice even for a prolonged period.
The nursing staff of a hospital caring for the diabetic patients must employ the necessary accommodations to suit the needs and demands of a patient. Registered nurse practitioners should even go beyond the basic requirements to get licenses (Dueker et al., 2005). There is more focus now on the overall treatment that is not grounded solely on the primary care. Today, they must have the proper training to diagnose and treat acute illnesses like DKA, be able to operate technical devices, interpret laboratory test results and even provide counseling to patients (Dueker et al., 2005). Advanced clinical practitioners do engage in primary care of the patients like conducting services and actual caring for the patients. However, they also must be able to specialize in a field for practice and they also have to put primacy too on the education of the patients for the prevention of the disease (Dueker et al., 2