Reasons in Using the Internet

People generally have two reasons for using the Internet. One is that it is useful to communicate with other people and, secondly, it has a comprehensive database of information than can retrieve immediately. Such information can be everything – a research report, a computer game, current stock exchange data, an update for a computer program, an item in a shopping catalog, an audio clip of a favorite artist, a road map to a destination, among others.
Naturally, such scope and importance in communication underscore how the Internet or the World Wide Web influenced the modern research method and design. According to D. A. de Vaus (2002), research design and methodologies are important ways of ensuring accurate gathering and explanations to data as well as in giving researchers confidence in drawing conclusions from the data gathered from different sources:
I use the term [research design] much more narrowly to refer to the structure of the data rather than the particular data… The central point is that it provides a context in which relatively unambiguous statements can be drawn… [and] move conclusions about causal processes from the realm of the plausible and possible to the convincing and compelling. (p. 31)
An essential preliminary to doing any social scientific research, for example, is to conduct a review of the literature. According to G. Nigel Gilbert (2006), this has two primary reasons: to ensure that a research question has not already been answered in a previous study and to relate your research to what has gone before, so that it contributes effectively to a growing body of knowledge. (p. 3) The Internet offers a new opportunity in this area as it provides an immensely rich resource for researchers. The World Wide Web can provide data in a literature review through both the conventional published kind and in the form of online databases of citations and surveys.&nbsp.&nbsp.The Internet can be a primary source of data collection through observation of the traces of Internet users revealed in email, chat rooms, blogs, and websites.