Speculate on the presence of ObsessiveCompulsive Behavior in the personal makeup of two characters in Rocking Horse Winner

This disorder is further divided into both obsessive behaviors and compulsive behaviors. Obsessions refer to the thought process, whether in the form of impulses or images, and compulsions refer to the consequent actions. A well-established set of diagnostic criteria define obsessions as repetitive, distressing, and continuous thoughts that are experienced and which cause a perceived need to behave in some way. An important point is that these worries and concerns go beyond normal, real-life concerns. More, attempts to suppress or to ignore these types of thoughts are frequent and often futile. The individual experiencing the obsession, in this type of disorder, is aware of the fact that the obsessions are emanating from the self rather than from external sources. Compulsions are the result of the obsessions. more specifically, compulsions are the acting out, either physically or mentally, of repetitive tasks. These tasks are performed in order to reduce the stress caused by the obsession or to prevent the occurrence of some feared event or situation. The important point is that these compulsions, these acts, are not logically related to the obsession and are excessive. In short, an obsessive-compulsive behavior is one in which obsessive thoughts cause compulsive acts which are not reasonable.
This essay will evaluate two char…
The important point is that these compulsions, these acts, are not logically related to the obsession and are excessive. In short, an obsessive-compulsive behavior is one in which obsessive thoughts cause compulsive acts which are not reasonable.
This essay will evaluate two characters in the Rocking Horse Winner. This evaluation will seek to determine whether these two characters, Paul and Joan, can be said to suffer from an obsessive-compulsive disorder. This essay will argue that Paul’s behavior, both in terms of his thoughts and actions, closely resembles obsessive-compulsive behavior. on the other hand, his sister, Joan, evidences some obsessive characteristics, but does not act out in the form of compulsions.
As an initial matter, Paul, like the other children, is haunted by a voice. The voice is persistent and it continues throughout the story. The voice conveys one simple message. The house needs more money. This causes an extreme sort of anxiety for Paul. He hears this voice, he considers it very carefully, and he even consults his mother about the relationship of luck and money. The text explicitly uses the term "anxiety" on multiple occasions. The nature of this voice is significant. It is not simply a soft voice which intrudes infrequently before going dormant. quite the contrary, as the story develops the voice becomes louder and more demanding. Thus far, Paul displays the common characteristics of an obsession. There is a recurrent and persistent thought, the need for more money, and an impulse to find out whether he is lucky. These voices are clearly intrusive and Paul neglects other activities in order to attend to his rocking