Support for Soldiers who return from combat affilicited with PTSD

Treatment and Care for Soldiers who return from Combat with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome ment of the Problem and Research Questions The behavioral manifestations of PTSD require a rigid collaboration of treatments. This paper is concerned of other effective therapeutic interventions as the statement of the problem. The following research questions are the highlight of this paper:
What kind of family therapy is effective in intervening PTSD?
What kind of behavioral therapy is effective in treating soldiers with PTSD?
Hypotheses
The present paper assumes that sand Play therapy is an effective family therapeutic method for soldiers with PTSD (Moon, n.d.). This therapy may be effective in terms of engaging the family where a soldier expresses his emotions in a three-dimensional box of sand by displaying small miniatures of soldier toys in the box. This paper also hypothesizes the effectiveness of trauma management therapy as a behavioral treatment (Frueh, Turner, Beidel, Mirabella, &amp. Jones, 1996). This therapy would make the soldiers learn how to manage their anger and how to function normally. Thence, this paper would like to validate the effectiveness of sand play therapy and trauma management in treating soldiers who suffer from the impediments of PTSD.
Rationale
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been considered as one of the major problems of the U. S Army organization because it triggered the thoughts of soldiers to remember death scenes. PTSD generates a system of how a psychological function of an individual is meddled by the occurrences of the traumatic events. Thus, PTSD controls the functional ability of the soldiers not to let bygones be bygones.
This paper explores how Posttraumatic Stress Disorder greatly affects the organizational mandatory of the army and how the organization made ways to intervene the needs of the armies with PTSD. The main purpose of this paper is to delved in other psychological treatments such as sand play therapy and trauma management treatment that serve as mechanisms and moderators of the soldiers’ terrors toward death and threat.
Description of the Selected Problem (PTSD)
Posttraumatic Stress is a psychological disorder that makes an individual experiences nightmares and repetitive flashback of painful thoughts that hinder the focus of one’s mind. Moreover, one tends to avoid things that could make him remind of the traumatic event with the feeling of isolation and anxiety (Sherman, 2012).
The US Army "Organization being adversely affected by the Problem"
The U.S Army Organization is affected with the psychological effects of wars to the mass number of armies who get affected from depression, isolation and trauma in the battlefields (Little, 2012). The organization is also affected with the soldiers’ great possibility to retire at a young age, which may result to high unemployment rates of the military service (Mcfarlane &amp. Bryant, 2007).
The Manner in which a US Army is being adversely affected by the Problem
A US soldier with PTSD gets affected because his performance will deteriorate and conflicts in the family will start to arise (Nelson, 2012). Moreover, a US soldier gets affected when he suppresses his fear to ask for help because he is afraid to be perceived as weak (Sherman, 2012).
The Perceived Benefits for the Organization Associated with Potentially Solving the Problem
The U.S Army organization promotes ways in dealing with the problem of PTSD. Recently, the U.S Army spent 171 million dollars to support the behavioral treatment of the soldiers (Nelson, 2012). Hence, money in the organization can be perceived as one of the trajectory ways in solving the problem for the U.S Army. Consequently, the U.S Army’s organization did their part in handling their duties and responsibilities as the employer of the armies who fought for the country.
Reference
Frueh, B. C., Turner, S. M., Beidel, D. C., Mirabella, R. F., &amp. Jones, W. J. (1996).
Trauma Management Therapy: A preliminary evaluation of a multicomponent
behavioral treatment for chronic combat-related PTSD. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 34 (7), 533−543.
Little, V. (2012, June 20). Post heightens awareness of PTSD programs. Army.Mil.
Retrieved from http://www.army.mil/article/82140/
Post_heightens_awareness_of_PTSD_programs/
McFarlane, A. C., &amp. Bryant, R. A. (2007). Post-traumatic stress disorder in
occupational settings: Anticipating and managing the risk. Occupational
Medicine, 57, 404-410.
Moon, P. K. (n.d.). Sand play therapy with U.S soldiers diagnosed with PTSD and their
families. Virginia, VA: Vistas Online.
Nelson, K. E. (2012, June 27). Capitol hill PTSD awareness event highlights struggles,
triumphs. Army.Mil. Retrieved from http://www.army.mil/article/82665
Sherman, B. (2012, June 14). PTSD: Knowing what’s wrong, getting help. Army.Mil.
Retrieved from http://www.army.mil/article/81779/
PTSD__Knowing_what_s_wrong__getting_help/