The Chrysanthemums by (John Steinbeck)

The Chrysanthemums In the short story The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck, the diversifies in his nature of literature. The author uses symbolism to express his ideas. The story is all about a farm girl whose life seems like a mix of fortunes. Elisa is frustrated and lonely however, his flower garden provides his with the much-needed joy. The author utilizes figurative language for instance “… black earth shining like metal…” (239).The author utilizes this to describe a given occurrence. The author breaks the monotony of narration with dialogue. His style is effective as it indicate the nature of the author to transform a given scene and to portray the main theme of the story. The story indicates the struggles of women throughout society. The story portrays the attitude in which society portrays towards women. The transformational nature of the main Elisa shows how women are essential in any society.
In an overall perceptive, the author uses Chrysanthemums symbolically to indicate the struggles of women in society. The psychological struggles are presented when the main actor feels neglected by her husband, the stranger represent a society, which appreciates women as equally important. The writer portrays the struggle women undergo in a number of societies. The title Chrysanthemums is a metaphor and the writer uses it to represent hope and comfort to those women oppressed in society. The manner in which women are unappreciated is represented when the struggler is offered a vessel but instead abandon it on the road "He might have thrown them off the road. That would not have been much trouble, not very much. But he kept the pot, (247)." The author plays part in demonstrating how despite efforts to portray their demands, society remains cruel and frustrate efforts of women who are discovering themselves within a community.
Work cited
Steinbeck, John. "The Chrysanthemums." Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X. J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia. 13th ed. New York: Harper Collins, 2011. 239-47. Print.