The Contemporary Practice Of Political Spin

The United States of America is the world’s most prominent democracy, and though never openly calling itself secular, it has been overt in proving its colorblindness in the matter of religion. But without doubt, Americans are probably more devoutly religious then any other people of the West. This devoutness has been the target of the Republican party of the United States ever since George W. Bush won the election in the year 2000.
The stance taken by the present government in the issue of gay marriages and the status of immigrants in the United States provides ample proof of the importance of ambiguity and ‘spin’ in U.S political rhetoric. The Republican Party cannot openly show its opposition to the proposition of same-sex marriages, considering the position that gay people have managed to win in society. Neither can the US government openly state that it considers closing the borders of the country a viable option for ensuring home security, considering that a giant portion of the American workforce comprises of immigrants living and working illegally. Thus in both cases the government has cultivated the backing of the Christian right by using religious terminology and hyperbole.