The History of Criminology

The Philosophers like John Locke, Cesare Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham prolonged upon the social contract theory to clarify as to why people entrust crime and how societies can successfully fight crime? The concepts can go on to play a huge role in the legal systems in a lot of nations nowadays, even though the approach in the current world tends to be a little more flexible. “According to Beccaria, crimes occur when the potential pleasure and rewards from illegal acts outweigh the pains of punishment. Beccaria’s theory was that in order for punishment to be effective, it must be public, prompt, necessary, the least possible in the given circumstances, proportionate and dictated by law” (Classical Vs. Positivist Criminology, 2013, par.2). It is significant to recognize the situation in which the classical criminology was expanded. At the time of the Enlightenment, Europe was altering completely, with a lot of nations rising from the feudal monarchies and completely improving their laws. Across Europe, this law was wildly conflicting and it still applied more variable. Board of judges and another legal official’s frequently lacked a wide training, and it arranged punishments completely out of quantity to some crimes as ignoring others. A lot of people understood the need for a more consistent and efficient justice system, and this method was the result.
Classical criminology is basically a financial theory of crime that concentrates on the criminal act as per the definition which is given by the law. The significant idea is those individuals who are less or more free to decide any offense as to one by a choice or of behavioral choices. The comparative attractiveness of any option is influenced by the costs that are connected with an illegal action.