The Implementations of the Arthurian Myths

The significance of the legendary King must have been very big since this character sometimes “draws” different plots into the “Arthurian” cycle of narrations –e.g. those that deal with the famous search for the Holy Grail.
In the present report, I will discuss two romances belonging to the Arthurian cycle: one of them is medieval (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), and another one was written by Sir Thomas Malory later in XVth century (The Death of Arthur).
Concerning The Death of Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory, this is, perhaps, the most famous romance belonging to the “Arthurian cycle”, in which the author brings the Arthurian legends in accordance with the “spirit” of contemporary society, and for that sake shifts the emphasis from delicateness and spirituality characteristic of Middle Ages towards power and manliness – the values and virtues of the XVth century.
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is English romance dated by the XIVth century – the century of J. Chaucer. Sir Gawain was one of the most popular characters of the contemporary knight romances. Analysing the text of the romance, it is hardly possible to overlook the linguistic virtuosity of its anonymous author that allows to build and develop an exciting plot, as well as to convey the idea of the romance in a very meticulous way, implementing intricate stylistic and narrative techniques. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is quite complicated in terms of structure and style.
There have been multiple attempts to find the books that could have served as possible sources for Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, yet all these searches were in vain, and this enables the researchers to regard the romance as an original work. Therefore it is considered very important for the development of English literature. To the contrary, The Death of Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory has written in the XVth&nbsp.century was mainly a successful and creative compilation and re-working of the French sources.&nbsp.