The Preference of Music and its relationship to Culture Personality and Mental Health

The Preference of Music and its relationship to Culture, Personality, and Mental Health. Brittin, Ruth. "Descriptors and Preferences for Eastern and Western Musics by Japanese and American Nonmusic Majors." Journal of Research in Music Education. 44.4 (1996): 328-340. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. .
This article is talking about the effect of three factors on the preference of music that are music experience, Familiarity, Complexity and peer approval. The article talks about students’ preference of music that is music major, non-music major, and junior high school musicians. The following cultures were included in the study Africa, India, Oceania, and the Caribbean. The study indicates that there is a difference in the preference of culture, and the more one is familiar with the music you tend to like it. Furthermore, someone’s peer might affect the preference of music but it depends on his or her age.
This source is important because it analyses the same subject that I want to write about. The author is writing detailed information about his research, with supporting tables and statistic numbers. The source is considered long but with credible information that is gathered from highly accurate measure called Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI). The paragraphs are organized with subtitles and celerity stating the facts and evidences.
Baker, Felicity, and William Bor. "Can Music Preference Indicate Mental Health Status In Young People?" Australasian Psychiatry 16.4 (2008): 284-288. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Apr. 2014.
The objective of this study is to investigate if the preferred music can affect listener’s behaviors, self-harm, and drug use. It surveys and discusses the relevant literature on music preference and audience music listening behaviors, and their links ones mental health. It states that different genres of music have a different impact of antisocial and drug use in listeners, and it provides example regarding each genre. Also, it studies the link between music preference and suicide. it shows that music can indicate emotional tendencies to suicide but not a cause to it. Moreover, it describes listeners personalities depending on which music they prefer. For instance, it gives an established relationship between rap music and antisocial behaviors, vulnerability to suicide and drug use.
The author uses events that have happened in the past to bring out the relationship existing between rap music for example and drug abuse for example, teens instigating a school shooting. This article is helpful in my work since it looks at the effects of the behaviors that might arise from lyrics incorporated in the music and how it is transforming our culture.
Cooper, Belle. "8 Surprising Ways Music Affects and Benefits our Brains." buffer. N.p., 20 11 2013. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. .
The article talks about how we react to music and how it affects our brains. He explains how music can affect ones emotions and ambient music can increase creativity. He goes deeper into explaining how music choice can predict our character and even gives a break-down of how different genres correspond to our different character. In addition, he writes of how music can help us exercise, improve our motor and reasoning skills as well as visual attention. He, notes that contrary to common belief that music can significantly distract us while driving.
This article is extremely helpful in researching this topic because it provides both sides of the effects of music, the positive and the negative effects. However, the advantages outweigh the negative effect and the author successfully brings out the positive effects of different genres of music to personality and health of the listeners.
Eells, Karen. "The Use Of Music And Singing To Help Manage Anxiety In Older Adults." Mental Health Practice 17.5 (2014): 10-17. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Apr. 2014.
This article consists of a study on the effects of music and singing in the management of long-term anxiety, dementia, pain and depression as an alternative for medication to older adults. The study reviews 11 online literature on Anxiety, older adults and music and aims at giving more understanding on how music and singing as a nursing intervention may affect the symptoms of anxiety in older adults. The study suggests that music and singing have a positive effect on the well-being and quality of life by providing enjoyment, social interaction, improved memory and social inclusion. It also observes that music and singing reduces anxiety levels in older adults, and decrease anxiety and confusion in those with dementia and thus can improve the quality of life among the elderly. In closing the paper, the author notes that the evidence of music as presented in his work is based on small studies conducted over a short time and thus difficult to generalize his findings.
This article is helpful in my work since it talks about music and singing and its effects on the mental health of individuals that are part the subject I want to write about. It uses a very accurate method in its acceptance criteria for literature and work to be included in the study that ensures the data and information contained in the work consist only the areas of music and singing and their effects on the elderly (Restriction for participants is set at over 65 years).
Thought Economics. “The role of Music in Human Culture” thoughteconomics.blogspot.com, 8 March 2013. Web. 21 April 21, 2014.
The interview seeks to give a clear opinion on what music is and its role in human culture. It explores the music business and how technology has influenced its production and consumption around the world where we have different cultures. It goes deeper to try and explain why music is fundamental to the experience of being human. Moby puts it “music provides us with a strange self-generated celebration of the human condition in the face of the universe that is ancient and vast beyond our understanding.” He goes on and tell us how “music transcends the limits of language,” how it comes in to fill the gap” by looking at the way we cannot express ourselves through the spoken or written word and makes up for the lack. The article inform us of how music influence politics, religion and other social phenomena
This article is important and relevant to the current topic since it discusses how music and how to influence our culture and interaction with people from different cultures.
Teo, Timothy, David J. Hargreaves, and June Lee. "Musical Preference, Identification, and Familiarity." Journal Of Research In Music Education 56.1 (2008): 18-32. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Apr. 2014.
This article is composed of a study performed between adolescents students from Singapore and the United Kingdom to investigate whether there are significant differences in preferences for, familiarity with, and identification of Chinese, Malay and Indian music. Students rated their preference for and familiarity with Chinese, Malay, and Indian excerpts. The study points to the influence of culture and education on students’ cognitive-affective responses to different ethnic music styles. For instance, Singaporean girls showed greater preference for, familiarity with, and identification of the Chinese and Malay styles than did girls from the United Kingdom. Both groups rated the Indian music lowest on preference and familiarity, although the Singaporean students were better at identifying it. The author uses effective methods in his sampling and analysis of the responses from students from the two countries.
This article is helpful in my work since displays how music preference and identification is affected by culture. Students from Singapore can easily identify music genres from their continent with much ease as compared to their counterpart from Europe.
References
Brittin, Ruth. "Descriptors and Preferences for Eastern and Western Musics by Japanese and American Nonmusic Majors ." Journal of Research in Music Education . 44.4 (1996): 328-340. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. .
Baker, Felicity, and William Bor. "Can Music Preference Indicate Mental Health Status In Young People?." Australasian Psychiatry 16.4 (2008): 284-288. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Apr. 2014.
Cooper, Belle. "8 Surprising Ways Music Affects and Benefits our Brains." buffer. N.p., 20 11 2013. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. .
Eells, Karen. "The Use Of Music And Singing To Help Manage Anxiety In Older Adults." Mental Health Practice 17.5 (2014): 10-17. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Apr. 2014
Thought Economics. “The role of Music in Human Culture” thoughteconomics.blogspot.com, 8 March 2013. Web. 21 April 21, 2014.
Teo, Timothy, David J. Hargreaves, and June Lee. "Musical Preference, Identification, And Familiarity." Journal Of Research In Music Education 56.1 (2008): 18-32. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Apr. 2014