The role of radiological imaging in the diagnosis of a child with abdominal pain

In children, one of the most common symptoms is abdominal pain. Many parents attest that their children would always complain of some tummy aches. In many cases, these episodes are known to be insignificant. Many children would have various thresholds of tolerating pain3. On the other hand, the parents would have a variation in their threshold of the appropriate time of bringing their child to the hospital. The paediatric and paediatricians rooms of emergency are always full of parents in need of attention from the doctors. In this case, the physician need to decide the patients who warranty for more work up with imaging and the type of patients who require the referral to the paediatric surgeon.4 The surgeons need to decide the types of patients that warranty the interventions of the surgeon and the patients who need medical observation or management. Even though the presentation in a child with abdominal pain may be common, all the individual children would give unique challenges to the involved physicians.
The abdominal pain pathophysiology is complex. The abdominal organ stimuli together with the gastrointestinal tract, move through the sympathetic nerves towards the ganglia of the thorax and the spinal cord. The shown stimuli have been reported to be poorly localized. The pain coming from the visceral glands is equally poorly localized, and is always believed to be the midline that is linked with the secondary autonomic effects like vomiting, nausea and pallor. In many cases, the many pain location may characterize the organ that is affected. The Epigastric pain comes from duodenum, stomach, pancreas, biliary system, or liver. Periumblical pain, comes from the small intestine. The infraumblical pain, on the other hand comes from the rectum and colon, ovaries and uterus, kidneys and bladder. The ovarian and renal pain is always located laterally to the side that is affected.