Traditional Approaches to Industrial Relations

If the modern human resource is more equipped, then the fact that today’s employees have not remained like their predecessors in following up the traditional managerial authority can also not ignored. Employees are more educated along with the qualities of more likely to question than to accept managerial authority, more focused on their own career development than on the organization’s interests, more mobile and are less loyal to their workplaces. Many managers see these characteristics in a negative light and advance them as yet more reasons why performance planning and review won’t work.
In fact, these characteristics of employees make today’s employees ‘knowledge’ workers and today’s human resource ‘knowledge management’. The jobs of these ‘new’ employees present new challenges for managers but, handled effectively, these challenges are a key to better individual and organizational performance. For example, knowledge-based jobs might involve high levels of non-repetitive work, with frequent changes in demand and direction making the prediction and planning much more difficult and uncertain. Other features of knowledge work also have an impact on the management of performance. (Rudman, 2003, p. 17)
Amon
Among most researchers working in the context of Human Resource paradigm, it is the explanations that matter any link to firm performance is secondary. It is assumed that societies, governments or regions can have HRM practices and policies as well as firms. At the level of the organization, the organization’s objectives and the strategy adopted are not necessarily assumed to be ‘good’ either for the organization or for society. (Millward, 2000, p. 5)