Was Outsourcing the A/P Project the Right Move for Tegan Given the Other Possible Alternatives

The leading issue with Tegan was time to dedicate to the A/P project (Upton and Staats, “Tegan” 2).
Out of various alternatives, one alternative with the IT department was to work on an enterprise resource planning system (ERP) to include the financial accounting module in the presently undergoing SAP but the huge investment ( £ 5 million) was a major hurdle in the way (Upton and Staats, “Tegan” 3).
The A/P system was based on an old copy of a packaged software system, named Dunnock, which has been tailored to the emerging needs inwardly and outwardly many times. Depending solely on Julia Jones, the only expert left could have been a risky proposition had Tegan decided to manage the A/P project by its own resources. Considering the alternative it seems that outsourcing the A/P project was the right step taken by Tegan (Upton and Staats, “Tegan” 2).&nbsp.
Generally, it does not happen that a project is assigned to the same company that has conducted the requirement analysis. If any trade-offs existed, they were not for a single entity. both the companies knew that leverage could be availed out of this scenario. For Tegan, it was a matter of saving hefty cost on the project if some other company’s bid had been accepted.&nbsp.
Engaging the same firm that has worked out the requirements analysis for the project had the trade-offs as it could have better insight on the functionality aspect of the prevailing system to duplicate it on a scalable system by using latest technologies, competent to handle large volumes. It could have eased the work of Hrad, the bidding company to perform a requirements analysis and guess the workload to offer a bid reasonably cost-effective for Tegan to agree on the terms and conditions of Hrad to finish the project. Tegan became assured that bid was not extraordinarily high for the given project (Upton and Staats 3).