Water in the California desert

As the climate continues to change the appearance of the planet,those who inhabit it, are faced with the various issues that come with such changes occurring in the first place. In times of considerable rain occurring,the concern becomes the potential flooding that would require specific plans in place,in order to aid those most affected. The same would also be said in instances were there would be a lack of water in the given environment that would also lead to problems that would need to be addressed in order to aid the general populous in the surrounding area, as well as any other regions that may be impacted. One such region to consider, in terms of discerning as to whether or not they would have a noticeable issue with water, would be the southern part of California.Different factors would be in place, in terms of assessing the situation in its entirety and determining whether or not the area of Southern California, would in fact have an issue with water availability. In terms of describing the region of Southern California, "California’s 25,000 square miles of desert can be divided into two basic zones. the Mojave, or high desert, and the Colorado, or low desert. Each of these areas contains unique fauna and flora, as well as other natural resources that make them an important part of California’s present and future. California’s deserts are home to two National Parks (Death Valley and Joshua Tree), a National Reserve (East Mojave), and California’s largest state park, Anza- Borrego," ("California’s", p.1). With the above mentioned importance that this region of California would have, it would remain essential to answer any problems that may arise for the area, which in this case, would be the issue of water shortage. Different organizations would be in place, with the essential purpose of gauging the water levels present within their locale.
In the case of Southern California, according to testimony provided by the chairman of the board of directors for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, in his testimony before a Senate committee handling such an issue, the director would outline what he felt were the issues facing the region, in testimony that would go toward the assertion that, in terms of a potential water issue for the region of Southern California, they would in fact be facing such a problem. In terms of describing the group that Timothy F. Brick would represent, "Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is the nation’s largest provider of imported water to an urban area. The population in its service area is more than 18 million, and it is projected to rise to 22 million by 2030. Metropolitan is comprised of 26 member public agencies that service an area spanning 5,200 square miles and six southern California counties," (Childs, 2007). As an organization that would represent a wide area and would service multiple counties within the region of Southern California, in terms of making the assertion that there would in fact be an issue with the availability of water in the area, they would be an organization that would know what they were talking about. In the period of time just before the Director would give his testimony, the area of Los Angeles alone, would have received an alarmingly low amount of rain, which in turn, would have translated into an issue for the overall water supply.
From a political standpoint, the Governor for California would set forth with a plan to handle the continuing issue of water deficiency that areas within the state, such as California would continue to see. As those involved would allude to, there would be methods possible in the process toward remedying the issue and seeking the best possible outcome. In terms of the political legislation suggested from the state level, "The plan is comprised of four policy bills and an $11.14 billion bond. The package establishes a