Women in Vietnam

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This reason makes historians refer to the war as a cold war. The war took place in Cambodia and involved attacks and raids on rival groups. The rival groups in this case were the Americans and the people of South Vietnam. The war had search and destroy operations that served to show the amount of power that each group had over the other. The United States had its theory on the war as it saw it as a way of preventing the spread of communism to the west, as it preferred using the capitalism policy. The war thus had an important figure to the fighters as each tried supporting their policies. In the war, there were women that served to assist the actual fighters who were mostly men (Gunusky 37). Women were very influential in the development of the war. This is because they were there to offer their support which if lacking, the fighters on each side could not have fought as effectively as they did. The women were the soldier’s wives, sisters and even mothers taken up by the military at that time to act as soldiers of war. They got training for all the missions that were to take place and thus were very skilled out in the field. The women had different roles in the war. There were those who were very talented in the field and had the rare opportunity to serve in the war as actual soldiers along their male counterparts. The women showed unending efforts and desire to help their sides win. For the women that were not strong or rather skilled enough to go out to the field and face the rivals in a live manner, they were delegated different aspects of work according to their intrinsic skills. One of the most identified roles that the women were given was the work of clinical attendants or rather they were given the job description of nurses (Tunner 76). The nurses had the strict and strenuous jobs of assisting wounded soldiers at the time when attacks took place. According to the communities that lived in the Vietnam region, they believed the work of nursing to be a talent that runs in the family and hence most of the nurses that were taken in had to carry along other family members to assist in their works. Since the nurses were to take their activities to places where the war was directly taking place, they had to training on basic weaponry use in case of attack. Some of the nurses did not completely finish their nursing as they were taken in to a 10-day training camp at Ft. Sam Houston (Caylor 65). With this training, they could be part-time nurses but could also work the grounds in case there was a short of army officers to carry out an ambush due to factors such as death or general incapability. Before the war had become serious, the nurses were given a bulk of injured patients and instructed to cure them within a given time span. This was influential, as it would help them prepare both psychologically and physically for the type of work that they would be doing in the fields. When the war would get harder and the enemy groups getting close, there would be many casualties and thus the need of competence on the side of the nurses to help cure soldiers fast. Upon healing, the soldiers were required back on the field to continue with the war so as not to lender their side shorthanded due to lack of soldiers. The nurses also had basic training of how to use a compass and a radio alert. This was important because not every time could the soldiers manage to bring back the wounded soldiers to the camp base. With the compass and the radio, the soldiers in the field could make radio alerts to the nurses. The radios had different signals through which they had an open line of communication. They would ask for assistance and give the required directives and bearings (Neel 37). The women on the other hand with the