Workplace Relationships

The study of Huy (2002, 31) led to the conclusion that ‘fundamental change in personnel, strategy, organizational identity, or established work roles and interests often triggers intense emotions’. For this reason, managers in all firms globally need to apply appropriate HR policies trying to promote the fair behavior towards the employees in all HR sectors (remuneration, promotions, benefits and so on). Moreover, it is stated by Blinder (1990, 117) that ‘employees usually feel that profit sharing and gain sharing are good for personal effort, company growth and productivity, and workplace atmosphere’. The current paper refers to job satisfaction within the modern workplace as it can be observed in two particular firms: Siemens and Rover. The first of the firms is a well known multinational corporation while the second has been almost diminished after being sold (due to financial problems) to BMW (in 1994) which in its turn sold it to a Chinese corporation, the Nanjing Automobile Group in 2005. The HR strategies applied by these two firms in relation with their employees are going to be presented and compared in order to identify through the issues developed the importance of job satisfaction for the personal and professional development of employees but also for the increase of firm’s profitability.
At a first level, it is stated by Frankel (2002, 150) that ‘workplace relations are both an expression of wider economic, political and social forces and a major influence on the life chances of most adults’. On the other hand, it is supported by Jackson et al. (1995, 248) that ‘employees do not respond to specific human resource policies and practices in isolation but they attend to and interpret the entire array of information available and from this, they discern cultural values and behavioral norms’. The response of employees in the HR policies applied in modern corporations can be identified through the case of two well-known firms, Siemens and Rover.